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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
which ignores the quantum leap in weapons technology between then and now. as the president pointed out in the debates, no other country comes close. >> we spend more on our military than the next ten countries combined. china, russia, france, the united kingdom, you name it, next ten. >> reporter: sequestration would not change that according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment, it is not the size of the cuts, about $50 billion a year that would be so damaging but the fact that they would be across-the-board. panetta adds that except for military pay every program from the joint strike fighter military band was be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely a foolish thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine. this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: in other words, if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration might not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> glor: pentagon contractors aren't the only one in with a stake in this debate. 120,000 small contractors take
interesting. >> a lot of western technology firms build for instance disk drives in thailand. when thai experienced severe flooding those western companies got hit. what is attractive about thailand for long-term investors? >> it's mainly political to begin with. as you know they went through a lot of political turmoil. you had the red shirts, the yellow shirts, fighting on the streets of bangkok and so forth but they have a fufl foundation for political stability which is very good. and also they have a very diversified economy. >> we'll continue talking with mark mobius tomorrow, china's communist party selects a new set of leaders this week. we will talk about how this change in power could impact china's economic relationship with america, and american investors. >> reporter: i'm sylvia hall in washington- still ahead, u.s. borrowers owe more than $1 trillion in student loan debt. so could helping them pay it down be a $1 trillion industry? i'll introduce you to some entrepreneurs who think so. >> susie: besides the fiscal cliff, invor no wall street were talking about some merger n
to get your take on the largest holdings, marvel technology. >> i think that is being passed by. it is a very poorly run company. maybe the 3% yield helps it. i don't want anything to do with that stock. i would like to go to cody in michigan. cody? >> caller: boo-yah. >> wow. nice. >> i want to know what you think of ttc? >> yeah, it's a great housing play. it's a winner. i feel like it's going to continue to win. and let's not forget carol in big missouri. carol? >> caller: boo-yah, jim! >> nice overtime win there, carol. what's up? >> caller: yeah, i'm wondering if you think alcoa aluminum is poised for a rebound in 2013. >> in 2013, yes. it does have tremendous cap for selling between now and year end. that is one horrible commodity that he has to deal with. it was like, you know, the copper corporation would be doing good. let's go to daniel in virginia. daniel? >> caller: yes? >> go ahead, daniel. you're up. >> caller: yep. >> you're up. >> caller: yeah, i'm wondering about ssys. >> stratus. yeah, that thing up is too much. that is a register ringer if i ever saw one. i do
.s. department of education. his district includes silicon valley, the birthplace of technology. mike has dedicated his life to public service and is lauded for his work on education, civil- rights national service, immigration, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and
to technology. >> the reality show is called "silicone valley" and it's now starring on bravo. the show benefits from the convergence of technology and pop culture. check it out. >> technology is such a part of pop culture. it's a part of all of our lives. it's a part of how we parent our children. it's a part of how we get jobs. it's a part of how we find love. most people are within an arm's length of their mobile phones, like, 99% of the take. >> randy zuckerburg took the company public to start her own media company. >>> several stories caught our attention today. photos as well. take a look. in india a little girl holds a stick to balance as she tight-ropes in the streets. children earn a meager living for their families by street prfling. >>> this town was bombed by syrian forces. more than 100,000 syrians have fled to turkey since syria's civil war began just last year. >>> in new zealand prince charles learning how to use a gun used to make carpets. the royal logo is on the one he is working on. it's part of the queen's diamond jubilee float. >>> this is cnn newsroom. new details now on
overtake banks to increase output by new exploration technologies. >> this comes from the iaea which released the world energy outlook 2012 on monday. the iaea predict greater oil and natural gas production, as well as rising energy efficiency, will allow the u.s. to become nearly self-sufficient by the year 200035. itself-- 2035. >> foreign imports are still 35 %. according to the iaea, by 2017, teh u.s. will over take saudi arabia. new methods for extracting oil and a shell gas reserves will be responsible for the turnaround. -- oil and shale gas are r esponsible. energy is in many industrial nations will fall slightly. it is a different story in china, india, and the middle east were declines will move sharply over the next decade. the international agency -- energy agency believes many will be shipped to asia in the future radically changing the map of global energy flows. >> and no major plunge for the dax today. we on this report from the frankfurt stock exchange on what is moving today. >> to 0.7%, the german stock index, lost in the previous week, so maybe it is already good
store, it's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep number we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set and for 5 days only enjoy 36 month financing on selected beds but only through monday. you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. >> a devastating explosion at a neighborhood in indianapolis. the force
rates and rigs. this technology is being deployed in such a wide area and so rapidly and with constantly changing technology that the issue for natural gas at this moment in terms of price isn't the depletion rate. it's the huge backlog of wells that have been drilled that haven't been connected to transportation networks to move it from the well head to the markets. so you have a lot of gas sitting there just waiting for the tap to be turned on and that will continue to happen because this is something that is changing the u.s. energy market and is something that at these prices is still profitable for the companies. >> before we let you go, what do you think they are saying in the halls of opec today about this report? >> i don't think halls of opec are that worried. china and the emerging market demand is not going to go away. it may not accelerate as quickly as some people had predicted. certainly the destination for oil from the middle east increasingly is going to be asia. it already has been. we are already looking at perhaps in the next five years according to this report today n
phone. across the parched land of the dense rain forests of the congo. technology is transforming things. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment, this reminds me of the arrival of punk rock in the mid- 70's. the clash was the very base of the rock-and-roll pyramid. overnight they gave the finger to be dreadful business that was at the top of the pyramid. it was called progressive rock. epix song, know the lyrics. great reviews. -- epic songs, no good lyrics. great reviews. but the band made no pretense of being better than the audience appeared they were the audience. virtuosity was out. the clash were like a public- service announcement with the cars. -- guitars. they gave u2 the idea that social activism could make for a good social right. i would like to point out none of your professors as ever draw the connection between the arab spring and the clash. [applause] [laughter] little intermission. ok. sharpen your pencils. i do not need to lecture you about change of the air you breathe. you are in it. i thin
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a lot of people talk about the science technology. >> engineering. >> engineering and math. right. [laughter] i do think -- i am all for studying all these interesting things, but i do think that having those kinds of skills -- the countries we worry about competing with us a lot of their focus is on those things that actually have real world usefulness in the economy, and germany for a long time i spent a reasonable amount of time in germany they've emphasized engineering and technical backgrounds and certainly china is doing it and as i said i'm also with historians and even economists. [laughter] but i do think that having a strong base of people with those kind of skills would be a great thing. >> i think the most important point is education matters a lot. if you look at the unemployment break down in the u.s. right now it is skewed very much to words high school graduates are sort of a range of numbers but i think it's around 13, 14%. and as you get up past high school graduate, college graduate advanced degree it drops precipitously in the there is a gap we have right now i
leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. oral-b power brushes. ♪♪ you can help othersnk along the way. ♪ ♪ a portion of every bottle that they sell goes to fight ♪ ♪ breast cancer and i think that's swell. ♪ ♪ the more you take, the more they'll pay, ♪ ♪ so make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> i am harris falkner, this is the fox report. time for the top of the news, breaking new details on the scandal that brought the career of general petraeus to an abrupt end. we are learning more and how it uncovered the relationship. officials sending harassing e-mails were sent to a woman named jill kelly. that is jill kelly second from the right in the photo sending right next to the general's wife holly. kelly was a family friend of the petraeus's. she got the e-mails she complained to federal investiga
for ignition technology. chevron says it will improve filtering equipment. company executives say their repairs meet industry standards. some are calling for the best technology available. >>> who do you think has the longest commute in california? california watch is reporting that designation goes to contra costa county. people who live in contra costa county spend an average of 32.8 minutes in their cars every day. in contra costa county, 17% of the people travel an hour or more to get to work. compared to humboldt, the average commute is about 17 minutes. around the state, fewer than one in 10 california residents commute for more than an hour. >>> speaking of commuting, let's check in with sal. many people have the day off for veterans day so i'm thinking it will be lieser -- lighter than unusual. let's take a look at some of -- at some of these commutes. you will be able to tell immediately at the toll plaza where it is light. you don't have to worry about getting into the city. there's certainly people out there. same thing with san francisco, northbound 101 traffic looks good. no proble
technology. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. ♪ ♪ >> neil: finally, it hasn't even been a week since the election and i'm already reading it's all mitt romney's fault. all of it. bull. not the mitt romney i knew. maybe the mitt romney you knew or mitt romney many of the media wanted you to know but not the romney i knew. he lost, but it doesn't make him a loser. the election is done. you would think that an relenting media might finally cut the guy some slack. it covered many campaigns and many candidates in my life. i have known few are more decent than mitt romney and don't get me started on his wife ann. i'm not showing bias. but i'll show anger i won't see hi in him. he's too classy to be caddy. i am not. media seemed fixated on romney sometimes fixing positions over years didn't apply to the same standard to his opponent shifting positions often over months. mitt romney can't evolve on immigration but barack obama can on issues like gay marriage. no, no, no. rip romney for contraception views that changed oaf decades. but say nothing about how in one remarkable
in the red, nostrils and telecom were the top performers while utilities and technology stocks lagged a little bit. copper rebounded from a two-month low after greece lawmakers gave the euro a boost against the dollar. closing 7638 per ton, posting a gain after five straight weeks of losses. the euro holding two-month lows versus the dollar uncertainty, weighing on the currency. hit an intraday low of $1.27 down nearly 2% against the greenback so far this month. sandra: jerry leavy to tell us what another 4% dip could be on the way and the biggest money makers, why outside the united states. very, what is the deal here? this huge selloff last week and yet before the election everybody said that the elections behind us, skip third-quarter earnings season, we will have certainty in the market and it will rally, it is just not happening. >> we are treading water. what is behind all this is traders are coming to the terms with the fact a lot of things have to go right for the market to make the next move upward. that doesn't happen, we will easily see a 5% correction. we are worried about
has fallen off the table. we have the technology now to make this information available almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic line. good morning, lynette. caller: i have not been watching
of infringing on its technology. and citigroup will pay 15.5 million each to former ceo vehicle recomme vikram pandit reflectinging t t progress the coma. >> some of it was money that it already -- i thought the number was 6.6 smld what they actually gave him as an incentive fee. >> for leaving? >> well, that's the irony of it. >> going quietly maybe. >> he didn't go that quietly actually. he said it was his choice. he blamed everybody else. >> that's all boiler plate, isn't it? >> i guess so. >> so the jacket was deliberate. >> honestly i said to myself i don't have a pin today and maybe i will just not wear the jacket as a wave rising above. >> interesting. >> mac even came over to hand me the jacket. >> i saw. >> deliberate. >> goldman sachs is in settlement talks over an $8.3 billion position that one of the traders had concealed five years ago. a settlement is expected in coming weeks. and i probably -- do i look different today? no? not really? >> did you get a haircut? >> no. i got power. last night. >> you got power. >> last night. >> like 11:00 last night? >> 11:00. >> so almost two f
's no film of any of those other things. the patterson film is the best. the more technology put into it with new developments with 3-d, it stands up better and better. >> do me a favor before we let you go and can you perform for us a squatch call? >> i can do one. >> great. >> just -- >> just go right after it. thank you so much. that was great. i'll pay for that later in the building i'm sure. thank you for joining us at the table. up next, toure turns into rod when he comes back to the table. >> thank you. >> thank you. you won't find a "home rule" on every corner, a "stag provisions" down every block, or a "hugh and crye" in every town. these are the small businesses of america, and all across the nation they're getting ready for their day. hundreds of thousands of small businesses are preparing for november 24, a day to open doors, and welcome the millions of customers who will turn out to shop small. small business saturday. visit shopsmall.com and get ready. because your day is coming. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the healt
in technology. alcoa is one of the largest and oldest companies in america. it's been hiring skilled workers since 1888, and today has factories around the globe. at its aerospace plant in whitehall, michigan, 2,100 employees are working three shifts a day, seven days a week. german-born c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld says alcoa's competitive edge is innovation, backed up by a skilled workforce. they're producing parts that make jet engines 50% more fuel efficient. >> klaus kleinfeld: i would love to show you how the air flow goes inside. but that's part of probably the best-kept secret that this industry has. that's the innovation i'm talking about. >> pitts: and a person just can't walk off the street and put that together for you. >> kleinfeld: impossible. >> pitts: kari belanger came to alcoa with an engineering degree. the company trained her to program robots to do the work that, 50 years ago, was done by hand. alcoa also helped pay for rod coley to go back to school and get his engineering degree. he x-rays parts to make sure they're perfect before they leave the factory. what do you say to f
much rather power this economy with the energy technologies that won't be viable for 30, 40 years from now as opposed to driving the economy with what's viable today. >> phil, this analysis said we could be oil exporters within the next 20 years or some what kind of an impact would that have on our economy as a whole? >> well i think it is going to give us a new form of income. it will lower our trade deficit. we were always concerned about, you know, sending all our money to china for goods and the trade deficit with china, it is not fair. guess what? we're going to be in a distinct advantage over china, not only from a trade standpoint because we're going to be able to provide them with energy they need but also because we're going to be able to attract manufacturing jobs here to the united states. why? because we're going to have the reliable, low-priced energy source for years to come. that's going to bring manufacturing back to the u.s. that will bring factories and jobs. this is historic. i'm euphoric. i've seen it coming for some time. i'm glad the international energy agency is
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)